How Fast Is A Bedlington Whippet?

how fast is a bedlington whippet?

Whippets and greyhounds are two of the fastest dogs in the world, but what about if they are paired with other dogs?

Does the offspring still have the ability to run at high speeds like the parents?

Whippets are able to run at speeds of up to 35mph thanks to their large muscles and light frame.

They are commonly used as working dogs here in the UK and are used for racing too.

Bedlington whippets have the shaggy coat of a Bedlington terrier but also the speed and agility of a whippet, making them exceptional working dogs.

You can easily distinguish a Bedlington whippet from their large heads, they are much larger than the head of a purebred whippet.

In this post, we go through how fast is a Bedlington whippet?

Helping you understand just how fast crossbreeds of whippets can be and if they have the ability to run as fast or faster than a whippet.

Let’s take a closer look…

What Is A Bedlington Whippet?

First, we need to look at what is a Bedlington whippet, to help us understand the genetics that they have that contribute to their speed.

A Bedlington whippet is a cross between a whippet and a Bedlington terrier.

This is a type of lurcher that is popular here in the UK for hunting small game such as rabbits and rats.

how fast is a bedlington whippet?
Image: adore62

This is because the Bedlington whippet has the shaggy coat of a Bedlington terrier, which allows him to burrow deep in holes and not be affected by nettles or thorns.

As well as having the genetics of a whippet, which includes the large back legs, small frame and ability to run at high speeds.

Bedlington terriers originated in a small town in Northumberland called Bedlington, hence the name.

The terriers were originals bred to hunt vermin but the dog has since been used for racing and numerous other sports such as coursing.

A Bedlington whippet has the body and frame of a whippet, whilst having the coat and heat of a Bedlington terrier, making them exceptional hunters for small game.

Origins Of The Bedlington Whippet

As mentioned the Bedlington terrier originated in a small town just outside of Newcastle Upon-Tyne called Northumberland.

It was a mining town in which the terriers were used to hunt vermin in the local area.

Whippets are descendants from greyhounds and were bred to hunt here in England purely because of their small size and ability to run fast.

Whippets are part of the sighthound family, which means they use their sight and speed to hunt game.

Pairing these two dogs together brings us the Bedlington whippet, giving you a dog that is perfectly suited to hunt rabbits, rats and other small game animals.

Bedlington whippets have been used as working dogs for many years, and make an excellent companion for those who own land and want to remove vermin.

How Fast Is A Bedlington Whippet?

So how fast is a Bedlington whippet?

They are able to run at speeds of up to 35mph just like a whippet.

This makes them a fantastic choice for those looking for a working dog as they have the speed of a whippet but the head and coat of a Bedlington terrier, meaning they can get in brambles and are much less affected by the environment than a short, smooth-coated whippet.

how fast is a bedlington whippet?
Image: adore62

Bedlington whippets also have the same unique running style as the whippet, they leap in the air whilst running, lifting all four legs off the ground at once so that they can maximise the distance travelled in their stride.

They almost look like a cheetah when the run as they are able to jump and cover much more distance than the average dog of this size.

How Much Exercise Does A Bedlington Whippet Need?

Many believe that Bedlington whippets need an ungodly amount of exercise each day to keep them fit and healthy.

But actually they only need around 40 minutes of exercise per day, as well as the opportunity to run at high speed in the open.

This can be a walk around your neighbourhood on the leash or could be off the leash in a local park.

Bedlington whippets are very similar to whippet in the sense that they love to be curled up on the couch just as much as they love to be out in the open fields walking.

Although these dogs love to run, they also have a very relaxed and chilled out temperament that is ideal for families that love to go on long walks in the countryside.

Bedlington whippets are generally slim and muscly dogs; it’s normal for them to look much slimmer than other dogs of their size and is an indication of their health.

How Long Do Bedlington Whippets Live For?

You can expect a Bedlington whippet to live for around 14 years old; they generally have every little health problems as they have both genetics from a whippet and a Bedlington terrier.

Both of these dogs are known to have relatively long life spans, and generally speaking the more breeds in a dogs genetics the better it’s health is.

This is why some lurchers can live for up to 20 years plus, as sometimes they have been crossed with multiple breeds.

Bedlington whippets are known to be a little nervous, they can suffer from separation anxiety if they’re left alone for long periods.

There are some common health problems you should look out for in a Bedlington whippet, here are some;

Ear problems

This can be inflammation in the ears or eat infections, it’s wise to keep checking your Bedlington whippets ears for signs of infection or discomfort.

Retina dysplasia

This is a condition that affects a dog’s eyes and causes total blindness, either in one eye or both.

Parents of the puppies should be screened for this condition, as it’s more likely to be present in the puppies if the parents have had it.

Copper toxicosis

This is a build-up of copper in the level, which can result in chronic hepatitis.

Again, the parents of the Bedlington whippet should be screened for this.

Bedlington Whippet Grooming

Grooming a Bedlington whippet usually requires a little more work than grooming a whippet.

This is because they have different types of fur, a Bedlington whippets fur is often longer and shaggy, meaning they need to be groomed more regular if you want to keep your house free of dog hair.

You should also ensure to keep your Bedlington whippets nails clipped nice and short, as it can become painful for them to run at high speeds if they have long nails.

I recommend taking a Bedlington whippet to the groomers once every three months, this will ensure that he’s nice and clean and has his nail clipped.

how fast is a bedlington whippet?
Image: adore62

You can, of course, give him a bath at home if needed, and it’s recommended to do so as their fur can harbour dirt if not washed regularly.

Other than this, Bedlington whippets are easy maintenance, providing they are fed on a high quality, nutritious diet and taken for regular exercise they should be fit as a fiddle.

Final Thoughts

So how fast is a Bedlington whippet?

Just as fast a purebred whippet, they can run at speeds of up to 35mph, which is simply breathtaking to watch.

This largely comes down to the training the dogs have had, but they have the potential to be just as fast.

Bedlington whippets are incredibly fast dogs, they also have a shaggy coat which makes them great working dogs for getting in bushes and brambles.

Bedlington whippets don’t need as much exercise as you may think too, a simple 40-minute walk each day will keep them healthy.

They are also low maintenance and just need to be groomed every once in a while and have their nails clipped.

It’s important to feed Bedlington whippets on a highly nutritious diet, as they need lots of protein to help their muscles grow, especially as puppies.

These dogs make excellent family pets and are superb for helping keep any other dogs fit and healthy, they love to run and play, but they can also relax for hours on end without a peep.

A Bedlington whippet loves the racetrack just as much as he loves his cosy bed.

Hopefully, you now know how fast a Bedlington whippet is, and have learned a thing or two about this wonderful crossbreed of whippet and Bedlington terrier.  

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